Social Worker Scott Grant raises $600 for charity in his physical health for mental health journey

Back in the summer, Scott Grant approached CameronHelps to say he would be raising money for our charity.  His mission was to raise money by attempting to run a half-marathon and gain sponsors. As the story unfolded (through his blog writings), the path changed, but the overall goal remained the same.  We caught up with Scott recently and asked him to explain.

Q: What set you out on this journey?

While completing my Masters, I experienced an episode of psychosis that eroded at my ability to manage happiness and contentment in my life. In retrospect, the therapist had now become the client; I was sitting on the other side of the “couch.”

In connecting with my former self was the familiar question I had asked clients hundreds of times “what were you doing when things were going better than they are now.”  A cardinal activity I was practicing when my mental health was better was exercise.

Q: Why the CameronHelps connection?

This is where my connection to Cameron Helps begins. I was directed to the organization through a professional contact and I saw an organization facilitating a form of recovery that touched me personally.  I decided I would welcome my family, friends and professionally colleagues through a blog I titled “Running from Pills, Pathology and Pizza.”

Q: What was your goal?

As a social worker and activist, I was aware of the devolution of support for mental health services. I decided to raise money as I wrote my blog to work to support CameronHelps in their incredible work with youth. My goal was to train and run a half-marathon and report on my mental health and training to the readers of my blog.

Q: What did you learn from your experience?

There is a part of me that is very critical in the fact that I did not end up running the half-marathon. As I completed my training, I realize that long distance running is not something I enjoy. In August, I turned my attention to Crossfit and on a sweltering summer morning, I ran, skipped, rowed and pressed my way through my first workout. As I lay on the floor unsure if I was going to be sick, I smiled and realized that I had found my own form of medication. Since starting Crossfit, I have reduced some of my medication and have personally enjoyed the privilege of vitality.

Social Worker Scott Grant raises $600 for charity in his physical health for mental health journey

Back in the summer, Scott Grant approached CameronHelps to say he would be raising money for our charity.  His mission was to raise money by attempting to run a half-marathon and gain sponsors. As the story unfolded (through his blog writings), the path changed, but the overall goal remained the same.  We caught up with Scott recently and asked him to explain.

Q: What set you out on this journey?

While completing my Masters, I experienced an episode of psychosis that eroded at my ability to manage happiness and contentment in my life. In retrospect, the therapist had now become the client; I was sitting on the other side of the “couch.”

In connecting with my former self was the familiar question I had asked clients hundreds of times “what were you doing when things were going better than they are now.”  A cardinal activity I was practicing when my mental health was better was exercise.

Q: Why the CameronHelps connection?

This is where my connection to Cameron Helps begins. I was directed to the organization through a professional contact and I saw an organization facilitating a form of recovery that touched me personally.  I decided I would welcome my family, friends and professionally colleagues through a blog I titled “Running from Pills, Pathology and Pizza.”

Q: What was your goal?

As a social worker and activist, I was aware of the devolution of support for mental health services. I decided to raise money as I wrote my blog to work to support CameronHelps in their incredible work with youth. My goal was to train and run a half-marathon and report on my mental health and training to the readers of my blog.

Q: What did you learn from your experience?

There is a part of me that is very critical in the fact that I did not end up running the half-marathon. As I completed my training, I realize that long distance running is not something I enjoy. In August, I turned my attention to Crossfit and on a sweltering summer morning, I ran, skipped, rowed and pressed my way through my first workout. As I lay on the floor unsure if I was going to be sick, I smiled and realized that I had found my own form of medication. Since starting Crossfit, I have reduced some of my medication and have personally enjoyed the privilege of vitality.

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